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About Scholars' Mine

Nurturing the Creation of Knowledge

Policies

The following policies address the principles of action adopted to direct the management and operation of Scholars' Mine. These policies are subject to internal review and modification.

Purpose

The purpose of this policy is to define the parameters of access and use for digital content housed in Scholars’ Mine, the institutional repository for the Missouri University of Science and Technology.

Access

All items in Scholars’ Mine will have a version of the complete content free to all Missouri S&T communities, with strong encouragement for free to all, with the following exceptions:

  • When contract with sponsor prohibits or restricts disclosure for a known period of time.
  • When blocked or restricted on a time-limited basis with the understanding that access thereafter becomes unlimited.
  • Licensed materials that are place in the repository and are limited by legal arrangements to specified users.
  • When an embargo has been imposed by a recognized authority.

Use

All content in Scholars' Mine is protected by United States Copyright Law. Any use of this content must be in compliance with United States Copyright Law and adhere to all defined licensing and use restrictions. Copyright for most content in Scholars' Mine is held by the author(s) or publisher. Scholars' Mine legally houses and provides access to content through a non-exclusive license agreement with author(s) or when publishers allow content to be housed in an institutional repository.

Some content in Scholars' Mine is licensed under a Creative Commons license agreement. Use of Creative Commons licensed content is dependent upon the terms of the Creative Commons license. The Creative Commons license and any additional use restrictions are clearly defined for each work.

Users may make or use personal copies in print or electronic format as permitted under statutory provisions of copyright law as amended, provided that:

  1. The author(s), title and full bibliographic details of the item are cited clearly when any part of the work is referred to verbally or in the written form.
  2. A hyperlink/URL to the original Scholars' Mine record for the item is included in any citation of the work.
  3. The content is not changed in any way.

Users may not:

  1. Sell the whole or any part of an item.
  2. Refer to any part of an item without a citation.
  3. Amend any item or contextualize it in a way:
    1. that violated copyright law and any existing license agreement or
    2. that will impugn the contributor's reputation.
  4. Remove or alter the copyright statement on an item.
  5. Make a copy of the item for use or distribution on another web site unless allowed by an existing license agreement.

Failure to comply with this policy may result in the infringement of U.S. Copyright law or an existing license agreement. Reported instances of noncompliance with the conditions of access or use are investigated, reported to the content owner and appropriate actions taken.

Policy Review

This policy and the actions and activities associated with it will be evaluated regularly to ensure that implemented strategies continue to support the Library's mission and policies, use resources in a cost-effective manner, and adapt appropriately to address evolving law and technologies. This evaluation will be completed at least once every three years.


 

Purpose

The purpose of this policy is to define the types of content that Scholars’ Mine will accept and any additional acceptance requirements.

Acceptable Content Types

Scholars’ Mine acquires, organizes, preserves, and provides global access to the research, educational, and cultural resources of the Missouri University of Science and Technology. This includes:

  • Journals and journal articles (preprints, post-prints, or published versions)
  • Student scholarship (Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETDs), essays, major research papers, etc.)
  • Creative scholarship and writing (dramatic works, music, poetry, etc.)
  • Books or book chapters
  • Research data
  • Conferences, conference papers and conference presentations
  • Video, still images and audio
  • Educational materials and presentations
  • Workshops and seminar materials and presentations
  • University administrative records and other materials pertaining to the operations of the institution
  • Other material not expressly stated here, upon approval by the Scholarly Communications Librarian and on a case-by-case basis.

Requirements for Acceptance

  1. Content must be produced, submitted, or sponsored by the faculty (current, emeritus, and retired), students, or staff at Missouri S&T and approved affiliations.
  2. All student contributions must be sponsored by faculty or an academic unit.
  3. Works published or created prior to an author’s affiliation with Missouri S&T may be retroactively deposited as long as the authors are currently affiliated with Missouri S&T and meet all other requirements.
  4. Works published or created by authors who are no longer affiliated with Missouri S&T may be retroactively deposited as long as the work was published or created by authors while affiliated with Missouri S&T and meets all other requirements.
  5. Content must be scholarly, educational, or research-oriented or of cultural or historical value to Missouri S&T. Works must be written in accordance to the tradition appropriate to the discipline, including review and editorial intervention.
  6. Content must be digital or able to be digitized.
  7. Content must be complete and ready for distribution.
  8. Content containing classified, confidential, and/or restricted data may not accepted or public access to the content may be restricted.
  9. The author or creator must be able and willing to grant the Institutional Repository the right to preserve and distribute the work, including fulfilling publisher conditions for depositing works and clearing copyright permissions when appropriate.
  10. If multiple files constitute an ‘Item,’ all of the files must be provided as a set.
  11. If the work is part of a series or set of related works, the other works in that series should, if possible, also be contributed so that a full set can be offered.

Additional Information about Content Harvesting

Scholars' Mine staff continually reviews scholarly journals, databases, and the internet for the publications and creative works of our faculty. When we locate publications, we will add them to Scholars' Mine following publisher policy and copyright law. This process, known as content harvesting, does not require the permission of the author or agreement to a non-exclusive distribution license.

Policy Review

This policy and the actions and activities associated with it will be evaluated regularly to ensure that implemented strategies continue to support the Library's mission and policies, use resources in a cost-effective manner, and adapt appropriately to address evolving law and technologies. This evaluation will be completed at least once every three years.


 

Purpose

In order for Curtis Laws Wilson Library (Library) to reproduce, translate, and distribute content submitted to the institutional repository (Scholars’ Mine) the copyright holder of the submitted material must agree to a non-exclusive distribution license. Additionally, copyright holders submitting content may elect to provide alternative Creative Commons license which can release some of the rights automatically assigned by copyright law.

This policy is subject to change as capabilities, standards, laws, best practices and technology impact the Library's ability to preserve and make accessible digital resources. The intended audience for this policy includes:

  • faculty, administrators, and students of Missouri S&T, 
  • researchers external to Missouri S&T who are collaborating with Missouri S&T personnel and who want to make use of Scholars' Mine services,
  • funders, and
  • users.

The objective of this policy is to enable the Library to legally post materials on the open web and to take the necessary steps preserve the materials (preserving the material might mean that the files will need to be converted to a different or newer version of a file format if the existing file format or the hardware/software needed to read it becomes obsolete).

Mandate

As an institution of higher learning, Missouri S&T supports scholarship, teaching, and learning. The Library is responsible for identifying, acquiring, and preserving digital resources for as long as needed to support the activities of the University. The digital repository's (Scholars' Mine) mandate for the preservation of these resources is drawn from responsibilities outlined above and specifically defined in: 

  • Lever 2.4.13 of Missouri S&T's strategic plan which states: “Continue development of Scholars' Mine designed for increasing internal and external communication and globally promoting the intellectual work of the campus.” 
  • Lever 5 of the Library strategic plan which states: "Explore opportunities to feature and develop Scholars Mine."  

The Library is committed to preserving and providing digital access to resources while respecting and upholding the intellectual property rights of authors and obtaining prior consent when the creator’s identity is known. Rights management actions are documented and rights information is preserved with digital content.

Scope

The requirement for a license applies only to materials submitted directly by the copyright holders. It does not apply to metadata or complete bibliographic entries created by the library to aid in content discovery or management.

Non-Exclusive Distribution License

Copyright holders who submit their work retain the copyright to their work, unless they explicitly give it away or sell it to a third party. The Library does not seek or claim copyright on any submitted materials.

A non-exclusive distribution license means that copyright holders may make other copies of their work available on other web sites or through other means without obtaining permission from the Library. They may also publish their work, in the same form or in a revised form, without obtaining permission from the Library. The Library charges no fee for the service and collects no revenue from Scholars’ Mine.

See: http://scholarsmine.mst.edu/scpro_guidelines/3/ to view the license agreement.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons licenses are web-based agreements whereby copyright holders can release some of the rights they are automatically assigned by copyright law. The copyright holder can specify conditions under which others can copy, distribute, or modify his or her work, provided due credit is given.

When submitting works, copyright holders have the option to apply a Creative Commons license that will:

  • allow or bar commercial uses of a work
  • allow or bar modifications of a work

Some communities within Scholars’ Mine, for example subscription journals, may have additional policies regarding licensing. If these additional policies preclude the use of Creative Commons licensing, the copyright holder may not apply such licensing without the approval of the community.

It is important to note that a Creative Commons license can only be applied by a copyright holder. The Library, and Creative Commons do not provide legal advice or services and assume no legal responsibility on behalf of copyright holders.

Policy Review

This policy and the actions and activities associated with it will be evaluated regularly to ensure that implemented strategies continue to support the Library's mission and policies, use resources in a cost-effective manner, and adapt appropriately to address evolving law and technologies. This evaluation will be completed at least once every three years.


 

Purpose

In the daily operation of our repository (Scholars’ Mine), Curtis Laws Wilson Library (Library) collects personal information about content contributors. This policy outlines how this information is preserved, managed, and protected.

This policy is subject to change as capabilities, standards, laws, best practices and technology impact the Library's ability to preserve and make accessible digital resources. The intended audience for this policy includes:

  • faculty, administrators, and students of Missouri S&T, 
  • researchers external to Missouri S&T who are collaborating with Missouri S&T personnel and who want to make use of Scholars' Mine services,
  • funders, and
  • users.

The objective of this policy is to protect the privacy of those who contribute content to Scholars’ Mine.

Mandate

As an institution of higher learning, Missouri S&T supports scholarship, teaching, and learning. The Library is responsible for identifying, acquiring, and preserving digital resources for as long as needed to support the activities of the University. The digital repository's (Scholars' Mine) mandate for the preservation of these resources is drawn from responsibilities outlined above and specifically defined in: 

  • Lever 2.4.13 of Missouri S&T's strategic plan which states: “Continue development of Scholars' Mine designed for increasing internal and external communication and globally promoting the intellectual work of the campus.” 
  • Lever 5 of the Library strategic plan which states: "Explore opportunities to feature and develop Scholars Mine."  

The Library is committed to preserving and protecting the privacy of Scholars’. Mine contributors.

Scope

The policy extends protection to anyone contributing content to Scholars’ Mine either through direct submission or through manual or electronic harvest of content.

Information Collected

The Library collects the following information:

  • Contributor information:
    • Name
    • Address
    • Phone numbers
    • Email addresses
    • Related web addresses
    • Biographical information
    • Educational Information
    • Institutional affiliations and positions
    • Research interests and disciplines
    • Research identifiers
    • Research works
    • Honors and awards
    • Courses taught
  • Statistical information
    • Site/page visits
    • Site/page activity
    • Readership activity
    • Download activity

How the Information is Used

The information is used to compile research profiles and to build a collection of works for our faculty, graduate students and other member of our campus community. These profiles and collections are then made available on the web to:

  • Showcase scholarship
  • Preserve the research legacy
  • Increase research impact.

 

How the Information is Protected

The Library is committed to preserving the privacy of our Scholars' Mine contributors. The personal information we receive through Scholars’ Mine is used solely for purposes of the functioning of the system, and for the specific purposes described above.

Personal information will not be used for any commercial or philanthropic purpose not directly connected with or approved by the Missouri University of Science and Technology. Personal information including statistical information containing personal identifiers is not disclosed to outside parties except when we believe, in good faith, (i) that the law requires it, or (ii) that disclosure is necessary to protect the rights and property of Scholars’ Mine users.

Personal and statistical information used in a publicly accessible forum, such as demonstrations, presentations, or research papers, will be scrubbed of specific references to real people unless it is for the specific purposes defined above.

Policy Review

This policy and the actions and activities associated with it will be evaluated regularly to ensure that implemented strategies continue to support the Library's mission and policies, use resources in a cost-effective manner, and adapt appropriately to address evolving law and technologies. This evaluation will be completed at least once every three years.


Download Policy

Purpose

The objective of this policy is to define the circumstances under which content can be removed from Scholars’ Mine and the associated process for removal.

Introduction

Scholars' Mine, the institutional repository for the Missouri University of Science and Technology is an online collection of scholarly and creative works produced by the faculty, staff, and students. Scholars’ Mine takes reasonable steps to ensure that the materials held within it are accurate and authentic. Materials contained within Scholars’ Mine are made available in accordance with publisher policies, non-exclusive license agreements with author(s),compliance with U.S. copyright and intellectual property laws and are not intended for removal except in keeping with internal policy or upon receipt of a valid and proven request for withdrawal. Requests for withdrawal must be in written form specifying reasons why the material should not be available in Scholars’ Mine.

Scope

The policy applies to all content housed within Scholars’ Mine.

 

Valid reason for withdrawal are:

  • infringement of copyright.
  • infringement upon a patent-pending claim.
  • violation of a pre-existing contractual license agreement with research sponsors or other parties.

Withdrawal Request

To submit a request for withdrawal complete and submit a Request for Withdrawal which is available from the Contact Us link in Scholars’ Mine.

Actions Taken

  • When a request is received the following actions are taken:
  • We will acknowledge receipt of the request.
  • We will restrict access to the item while the request is investigated.
  • We will investigate the validity of the claim and seek to verify the identity and authority of the person making the request.
  • We will follow university policy and seek professional advice if required.
  • We will contact the involved parties concerning the findings of the investigation and the resolution of the request.
  • We will seek to resolve the request to the satisfaction of all parties.
  • Possible outcomes include:
    • The item remain is the repository as is and the temporary restriction to access is removed.
    • The item is appropriately modified or additional access restrictions imposed.
    • The item is permanently removed from the repository. Descriptive metadata for the item may remain in the repository.

Policy Review

This policy and the actions and activities associated with it will be evaluated regularly to ensure that implemented strategies continue to support the Library's mission and policies, use resources in a cost-effective manner, and adapt appropriately to address evolving law and technologies. This evaluation will be completed at least once every three years.


Purpose

The objective of this policy is to define how Scholars’ Mine is governed and managed.

Governance

Scholars' Mine is the institutional repository for the Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T) and is operated and managed by Curtis laws Wilson Library. The Scholarly Communications Librarian has overall responsibility for management, development and growth of Scholars' Mine. The Institutional Repository Coordinator reports to the Scholarly Communications Librarian and provided daily management and oversight of Scholars' Mine operations including management of student employees and coordination with other library staff.  

The Scholars' Mine Management Team is led by the Scholarly Communications Librarian with the assistance of the Institutional Repository Coordinator. Other members of the team include librarians and library staff who play a role in the operation of Scholars’ Mine. This team meets weekly to review ongoing projects, schedule work and discuss and resolve operating issues as they arise.

Input and influence from the campus at large is provided through the Scholars' Mine Advisory Committee. This committee, chaired by the Scholarly Communications Librarian shall meets twice a year, once in the fall and spring to review progress, monitor growth and provide strategic advice. The committee membership shall consist of the Institutional Repository Coordinator who acts a Secretary, The Library Directory and Assistant Director and other campus stakeholders.

Policy Review

This policy and the actions and activities associated with it will be evaluated regularly to ensure that implemented strategies continue to support the Library's mission and policies, use resources in a cost-effective manner, and adapt appropriately to address evolving law and technologies. This evaluation will be completed at least once every three years.


Purpose

The Library is committed to preserving and maintaining digital resources that support the mission of the University and Library for as long as they are useful to their respective community of users. This policy describes the need and strategies for preserving Missouri S&T's digital resources and outlines the proactive steps taken to preserve these materials to ensure that faculty, staff, students, and other users will have ongoing sustainable access to our expanding digital collections. Collection specific strategies for continuous preservation will be developed in conjunction with this policy. This policy is subject to change as capabilities, standards, best practices and technology impact the Library's ability to preserve these resources. The intended audience for this policy includes:

  • faculty, administrators, and students of Missouri S&T, 
  • researchers external to Missouri S&T who are collaborating with Missouri S&T personnel and who want to make use of Scholars' Mine services,
  • funders, and
  • users.

The objectives are:

  • to collect, publish and preserve the digital resources created by our campus community as they relate to research, education, and campus culture and life. This includes the digital data sets and associated documentation generated by campus community researchers and their affiliates.
  • to enable campus community researchers to satisfy the requirements of funding agencies in managing, sharing and preserving research data.
  • to provide the means for researchers, policy makers, and others to discover and access digital resources, including datasets,  generated through research done at or in conjunction with Missouri S&T for the long term.
  • to provide a sustainable preservation environment where digital resources including research datasets, are available to support the historical record of research and are accessible for use for contemporary scholarship.

This policy is a set of guidelines for digital preservation, from which procedures can be developed with confidence that they meet accepted standards, effectively use resources, and support the mission and goals of the Library. Objectives of this policy are to:

  • Describe the challenges associated with digital preservation.
  • Explain the necessity of a digital preservation policy.
  • Outline the principles on which digital preservation actions are based.
  • State the scope of digital preservation activities, including sources and types of digital content that will be preserved.
  • Define the strategies that will be performed to ensure the long-term preservation of digital resources.
  • Identify stakeholders responsible for components of the digital preservation strategies.
  • Define a policy review schedule.

Introduction

Curtis Laws Wilson Library creates and manages original digital content as well as purchases and licenses a growing number of digital resources. Digital objects have a much higher preservation risk compared to traditional materials due to their fragile nature and evolving hardware, software, standards, and file formats. The library defines digital preservation as "the series of management policies and activities necessary to ensure the enduring usability, discoverability, and accessibility of content over the very long term." Digital preservation differs from analog preservation in that:

  • Digital preservation requires active management. While many analog materials, such as books, can survive for years when simply stored in a climate-controlled environment, digital materials that are left alone for long periods of time are much more likely to degrade beyond repair, and this degradation is generally not discovered until there is an attempt to use the item.
  • The preservation needs of analog materials, such as books, journals, film, and tape, are well understood and have not greatly changed over time. However, digital preservation is a new and developing field with standards that are still being created. New tools and technologies will require that digital preservation activities be responsive and adaptable.
  • The expertise to treat analog materials generally exists within one department within the library. The expertise and actions required to preserve digital content exists across multiple library departments as well as external to the library. A robust digital preservation infrastructure will inherently operate within a collaborative and communicative workspace

Mandate

As an institution of higher learning Missouri S&T supports scholarship, teaching, and learning. Curtis Laws Wilson Library is responsible for identifying, acquiring, and preserving scholarly resources for as long as they are needed to support the activities of the University. The digital repository's (Scholars' Mine) mandate for the preservation of digital resources is drawn from responsibilities outlined above and specifically defined in: 

  • Lever 2.4.13 of Missouri S&T's strategic plan which states: “Continue development of Scholars' Mine designed for increasing internal and external communication and globally promoting the intellectual work of the campus.” 
  • Lever 5 of the library strategic plan which states: "Explore opportunities to feature and develop Scholars Mine."  

Principles

These principles guide all digital preservation actions:

Access: Digital preservation is done with the understanding that long-term access is the primary goal. Access to digital collections will be supported to the best of our ability given available technology and resources; however, perpetual access to digital materials cannot be guaranteed.

Authenticity: All digital objects will be created with supporting metadata to establish authenticity and provenance. Digital objects will be managed to ensure that they are unaltered and the original data is preserved.

Collaboration: The Library will investigate and participate in collaborative agreements whenever possible so long as they are a good use of Library resources.

University and Library Missions: This policy and actions associated with it exist in support of stated University and Library missions. This policy will be annually reviewed against University and Library missions and goals to ensure that it continues to support the core work of the institution.

Intellectual Property: The Library is committed to providing access to digital materials while respecting and upholding the intellectual property rights of authors and obtaining prior consent when the creator’s identity is known. Rights management actions will be documented and rights information will be preserved with digital content.

Standards and Best Practices: The Library will observe current standards and best practices related to the creation, maintenance, storage, and delivery of digital objects and metadata, as determined by international, national, consortia and local institutions and governing bodies.

Sustainability: Digital preservation activities will be planned and implemented in ways that best manage current resources and can be sustained into the future. 

Training: The Library will commit to on-going training and development of staff in areas related to digital preservation, as well as outreach to inform faculty, students, and staff of the best practices for creating and maintaining digital objects.

Technology: The Library will fulfill digital preservation objectives by developing, maintaining or contracting the necessary hardware, software, expertise, and protocols to ensure long term access.

Scope

Curtis Laws Wilson Library is responsible for identifying, securing, and providing the means to preserve and ensure ongoing access to digital resources. Digital resources collected by the library fall into these general categories:

  1. Subscription-based resources: journals and databases, to which the Library pays for access, but does not own copyright.
  2. Escrow files: archival backup files of electronic resources, which may be purchased by the Library or submitted by vendors in fulfillment of contractual obligations.
  3. Missouri S&T-owned digital resources: 
    • Analog objects owned by the Library or Missouri S&T that are selected for digital conversion.
    • Born-digital objects and publications created by the Library or the Missouri S&T community.
    • Electronic publications created by the Library or members of the Missouri S&T community as works for hire and with the assistance of Library staff and hosted by the Library. 
    • Digital files that are produced in the course of creating a physical or digital exhibit by the Library or members of the Missouri S&T community. 
    • Other Digital resources collected by the Library or Missouri S&T that are unlikely to exist elsewhere.
  4. Selected research and scholarship generated by the Missouri S&T community:
    • Publications of faculty, students, research centers, labs and other community members.
    • Research data created by  faculty, students, research centers, labs and other community members.
    • Other resources related to the research and scholarly activities of the Missouri S&T community.
  5. Selected resources related to campus culture and life.
  6. University records: records created by colleges, departments, and other units within the university in the course of conducting business.

The library is committed to the preservation of all digital resources through their life cycle and will develop the technical infrastructure to support the creation, maintenance, and access of digital resources for the long term. It is also committed to supporting staff in developing the expertise necessary to perform these activities.

Content Types

Each content source listed above may present content in one or more of the following content types. Each content type may require different preservation strategies.

Textural materials (ebooks, articles, etc.)

Images (scanned text, photographs, digital photographs, digital art, etc.)

Audio/video materials (videos, recorded sound, etc.)

Numerical data/datasets (research data, etc.)

The library may acquire materials in additional formats in the future which will require the development of additional preservation strategies.

Digital Preservation Strategies

The specific preservation strategy used for digital resources will depend on the source of and type of content, as well as existing technology, expertise, and ongoing support. Preservation actions to be taken are as follows:

Subscription-based resources: These resources are not owned or directly controlled by the Library; therefore Library cannot manage them. Instead, these resources are primarily managed by agreement with the publisher or vendor. The library will negotiate such preservation agreements when developing subscription and license contracts with publishers and vendors.

Resources created by, or for, and owned by the Library or University:  These resources will be managed by the Library using the life cycle model outlined below. The expectation is that these resources and associated metadata will be developed according to current standards and best practices, and stored in a long-term repository within the Library infrastructure.

Scholarly and research resources created by members of our campus community, but not owned by the Library or University: These resources will be managed by the Library using the life cycle model outlined below. The expectation is that these resources and associated metadata will be developed according to current standards and best practices, and stored in a long-term repository within the Library infrastructure.  

Life Cycle Management

Digital objects will be managed using the life cycle model. This model is a framework describing the stages that digital resources go through during their existence. The preservation of digital objects requires planning and action at every stage of an object's lifecycle.  

Creation – As digital content is created, preservation actions should include creating and/or capturing administrative, descriptive, structural and technical metadata about the objects, as well as imposing a well-defined storage system. Content will be created following current standards and best practices for capture and formatting.

Selection –Selection for digital preservation will be done in coordination with current use, existing Library collection development policies, and collaborative agreements, while addressing specific format needs and budgetary limitations. All preservation actions will be taken under the assumption that materials selected for the library collections are intended for permanent retention unless explicitly stated otherwise.

Ingest –Ingestion of materials into the collections will strictly follow local guidelines and procedures. These guidelines will include delivery of content to the responsible department/personnel, verification of file types, validation of file content, normalization of files as needed, creation or enhancement of metadata according to standards set forth in metadata policies, and transfer of data and metadata to an approved long-term storage system.

Metadata Creation – All digital resources will adhere to the Library metadata policy and practice. Essential preservation metadata includes:

  • Administrative
  • Technical
  • Structural
  • Provenance
  • Rights

Storage – Digital resources must be stored in a manner that is consistent with accepted best practices in the digital preservation community. This will include both technical infrastructure (hardware, software, network access, data backup, facilities, maintenance, etc.) and ongoing preservation management activities. Best practice in digital preservation requires duplicating digital objects in both local systems and geographically removed systems. The Library will pursue this by working with University IT and other service providers to host redundant local storage. Library staff will also explore other methods of storing data off site, such as in a private LOCKSS network, the HathiTrust, the Internet Archive, or another collaborative group.

Preservation Management – Preservation management is a series of actions that will need to be performed on digital resources prior to and during long-term storage, at varying levels depending on the source and type of resource. Detailed procedures and workflows for preservation actions will be created and maintained. Possible preservation actions include, but are not limited to:

  • Content and metadata validation
  • Preservation audits – Preserved content will undergo periodic audits to ensure that activities are meeting stated commitments, that risks are reduced, and to verify authenticity and accessibility of content.
  • Ongoing file format review
  • Migration – conversion of data to new file formats and/or migration to new storage media as needed.
  • Definition and monitoring of backup procedures.
  • Maintenance of technical components such as hardware and software used for storage and access. 

Access and Use - Digital objects and collections will be reviewed and managed to ensure that files are accessible into the future. Digital objects will be discoverable: created in a way that they may be easily found by all stakeholders.

Transformation – Digital resources may require periodic modification. Possible reasons for modification include: to support new developments in scholarly research capability, to function optimally in new delivery systems, and to prevent format, hardware, or software obsolescence. Types of modifications that may be performed include creating new content or metadata, adding content or metadata, migrating content to a new format, and creating a subset of content or metadata.

De-selection – Digital objects will be reviewed and disposed of as needed, based on collection development policies.

Levels of Preservation

The Repository provides three levels of preservation support for specific file formats. These support levels were determined by evaluating the prevalence of the file format in the marketplace, whether the format is proprietary, the availability of tools for emulation or migration and the availability of local resources to take specific preservation actions. The Repository will undertake appropriate format monitoring and provide adequate staffing and other resources to support the services offered at each level. Over time, we expect our ability to provide full preservation support for more formats to increase as additional tools and techniques are developed. We are developing specification and format best-practice guidelines for common content types in order to assist content providers and to ensure that contents meets the level of quality necessary for full information capture and the highest degree of preservability.

Levels of Preservation Support

Level 1

Best effort to maintain the content, structure and functionality in the future

 

Example: TIFF

  1. Provided only for formats that are publicly documented and widely used which makes it more likely that tools will exist or be developed to undertake preservation actions, and that such actions will result in understood and controlled transformation or migration.
  2. Content may be transformed to another stable format (normalized) to provide assurance that the information content is preserved.
  3. Content will be preserved as originally deposited to ensure the original bit stream is always available.

Level 2

Limited efforts to maintain the usability of the files as well as preserving them as submitted

 

Example: Microsoft Word

  1. The file format will be monitored and may be transformed when significant risk to access is imminent. It may be difficult to predict or control the consequences of any transformation or migration on content, structure or functionality.
  2. The file may also be transformed to a more preservable format to ensure that the information content is not lost, even if some structure and functionality are sacrificed.
  3. This level of support is generally applied to proprietary formats that are widely used, where there is substantial commercial interest in maintaining access to files saved in the format, and therefore tools will likely be available to migrate them to successor formats

Level 3

Basic preservation of the file and associated metadata as is

 

Example: PhotoCD

 

  1. No active effort will be made to monitor the file format, associate risks. or, to normalize, transform, or migrate the file to another format.
  2. Files may be openable and/or readable by future applications, but there is no guarantee that the content, structure, or functionality will be preserved.
  3. This service level usually applies to files written in highly specialized, proprietary formats, often usable only in a single software environment, formats no longer widely utilized, and/or formats about which little information is publicly available.
  4. Any format not yet reviewed and evaluated will also receive Level 3 service on deposit. A higher level may be assigned after format review takes place.

 

Primary Preservation Services by Level

Feature

Level 1

Level 2

Level 2

Persistent identifier that will always point to the object and/or its metadata

Yes

Yes

Yes

Provenance records and other preservation metadata to support accessibility and management over time

Yes

Yes

Yes

Secure storage and backup

Yes

Yes

Yes

Periodic refreshment to new storage media

Yes

Yes

Yes

Fixity checks using proven checksum methods

Yes

Yes

Yes

Storage in a trusted preservable format (making a normalized version, if necessary)

Yes

For Some Formats

No

Strategic monitoring of format

Yes

Yes

No

Migration to succeeding format upon obsolescence

Yes

No

No

 

The three levels of preservation are applied at the individual file level. Complex content items comprised of multiple files in various formats will require additional evaluation to determine whether the operational relationships between the files can be maintained. The original relationships can be documented externally in metadata to ensure that the relationships are preserved. Also executables and some files that rely on a specific hardware/software environment will require additional evaluation because not only the format but the access environment must be considered in making a preservation determination.

Stakeholders 

Stakeholders in digital preservation include the Library, users of Library collections, faculty, students and other University community units and members who create digital content housed by the Library. Explicit responsibilities of stakeholders in carrying out preservation strategies include:

Acquisitions – Manages the purchasing and licensing of electronic resources. 

Metadata Librarian – Manages the creation of metadata to ensure compliance with standards, best practices, and existing metadata policies.

Electronic Services Librarian – Manages the licensing of subscription-based digital content. Ensures that sufficient third-party preservation agreements are met whenever possible.

Collection Development Team – Manages the collection development review and de-selection of digital resources as needed. Ensures ongoing harmony of digital collections with print collections and the Library’s collection development policies. 

Archivist – (1) Manages University records, including ingestion of records into the records management system and subsequent transfer to Archives or other storage as needed. (2) Selects and manages College records and cultural artifacts to be preserved.

Scholarly Communications Librarian – (1) In cooperation with the Archivist manages the creation of digital content within the Library and ensures that standards and best practices are followed for the creation of digital content, including the capture of preservation metadata. (2) Oversees and manages the Library's digital preservation strategies, with particular emphasis on selection, ingestion, storage, preservation management, transformation, and coordination with third-party preservation services. Ensures general compliance with standards and best practices. Coordinates activities across departments and with external vendors. (3) Manages the Library's Digital Publishing Program. 

Scholars' Mine Team  – (1) Manages the creation, ingestion, and maintenance of digital objects into the Institutional Repository. (2) In coordination with other Library departments and Campus IT, manages the technical infrastructure needed to create, ingest, store, transform, and provide access to digital resources within the Institutional Repository. (3) Creates, installs, and maintains software as needed and provides support for staff using these tools. (4) Manages accessibility and user interface design to ensure usability and discoverability of digital resources.

Policy Review

This policy and the actions and activities associated with it will be evaluated regularly to ensure that implemented strategies continue to support the Library's mission and policies, use resources in a cost-effective manner, and adapt appropriately to address evolving technologies. This evaluation will be completed at least once every three years.

Standards and Best Practices

The Library will observe national and international standards and best practices for the creation and management of digital objects, along with the associated metadata needed to maintain resources throughout their lifecycle. Open source formats will be preferred.

Relevant standards include:

Open Archival Information System Reference Model (OAIS)

PREMIS Data Dictionary for Preservation Metadata

Data Seal of Approval

Trustworthy Repositories Audit & Certification (TRAC)


 

Purpose

The Library is committed to preserving and maintaining research data created by our campus community as long as it supports the mission of the University and Library and is useful to the respective community of users. This policy supplements our existing Digital Preservation Policy by describing needs and strategies specific to preserving research data. Collection specific strategies for the continuous preservation of research data will be developed in conjunction with this policy. This policy is subject to change as capabilities, standards, best practices and technology impact the Library's ability to preserve these resources. The intended audience for this policy includes:

  • faculty, administrators, and students of Missouri S&T, 
  • researchers external to Missouri S&T who are collaborating with Missouri S&T personnel and who want to make use of Scholars' Mine services,
  • funders, and
  • users.

The objectives are:

  • to collect, publish and preserve research data created by our campus community that relates to research, education, and campus culture and life. This includes the digital data sets and associated documentation generated by campus community researchers and their affiliates.
  • to enable campus community researchers to satisfy the requirements of funding agencies in managing, sharing and preserving research data.
  • to provide the means for researchers, policy makers, and others to discover and access research data generated through research done at or in conjunction with Missouri S&T for the long term.
  • to provide a sustainable preservation environment where research data is available to support the historical record of research, and accessible for use for contemporary scholarship.

This policy is a set of guidelines for the digital preservation of research data, from which procedures can be developed with confidence that they meet accepted standards, effectively use resources, and support the mission and goals of the Library. Objectives of this policy are to:

  • Describe the challenges associated with the digital preservation of research data.
  • Explain the necessity of a research data management policy.
  • Outline the principles on which the digital preservation of research data are based.
  • State the scope of digital research data preservation activities, including sources and types of digital content that will be preserved.
  • Define the strategies that will be performed to ensure the long-term preservation of research data.
  • Identify stakeholders responsible for components of the digital preservation strategies.
  • Define a policy review schedule.
  • Define terms, identify standards, and list resources that will inform digital preservation activities.

Introduction

Curtis Laws Wilson Library creates and manages original digital content as well as purchases and licenses a growing number of digital resources. Digital objects such as research data have a much higher preservation risk compared to traditional materials due to their fragile nature and evolving hardware, software, standards, and file formats. The library defines digital preservation as "the series of management policies and activities necessary to ensure the enduring usability, discoverability, and accessibility of content over the very long term."1 Digital preservation differs from analog preservation in that:

  • Digital preservation requires active management. While many analog materials, such as books, can survive for years when simply stored in a climate-controlled environment, digital materials that are left alone for long periods of time are much more likely to degrade beyond repair, and this degradation is generally not discovered until there is an attempt to use the item.
  • The preservation needs of analog materials, such as books, journals, film, and tape, are well understood and have not greatly changed over time. However, digital preservation is a new and developing field with standards that are still being created. New tools and technologies will require that digital preservation activities be responsive and adaptable.
  • The expertise to treat analog materials generally exists within one department within the library. The expertise and actions required to preserve digital content exists across multiple library departments as well as external to the library. A robust digital preservation infrastructure will inherently operate within a collaborative and communicative workspace

Mandate

As an institution of higher learning Missouri S&T supports scholarship, teaching, and learning. Curtis Laws Wilson library is responsible for identifying, acquiring, and preserving research data for as long as  needed to support the activities of the University. The digital repository's (Scholars' Mine) mandate for the preservation of research data is drawn from responsibilities outlined above and specifically defined in: 

  • Lever 2.4.13 of Missouri S&T's strategic plan which states: “Continue development of Scholars' Mine designed for increasing internal and external communication and globally promoting the intellectual work of the campus.” 
  • Lever 5 of the library strategic plan which states: "Explore opportunities to feature and develop Scholars Mine."  

Principles and Practices

These principles guide all digital preservation of research data:

Access: Digital preservation of research data is done with the understanding that long-term access is the primary goal. Access to digital collections will be supported to the best of our ability given available technology and resources, however perpetual access to digital materials cannot be guaranteed.

Authenticity: All digital objects will be created with supporting metadata to establish authenticity and provenance. Digital objects will be managed to ensure that they are unaltered and the original data is preserved.

Collaboration: The Library will investigate and participate in collaborative agreements whenever possible so long as they are a good use of Library resources.

University and Library Missions: This policy and actions associated with it  exist in support of stated University and Library missions. This policy will be annually reviewed against University and Library missions and goals to ensure that it continues to support the core work of the institution.

Intellectual Property: The Library is committed to providing access to research data while respecting and upholding the intellectual property rights of authors and obtaining prior consent when the creator’s identity is known. Rights management actions will be documented and rights information will be preserved with digital content.

Standards and Best Practices: The Library will observe current standards and best practices related to the creation, maintenance, storage, and delivery of research data and metadata, as determined by international, national, consortia, and local institutions and governing bodies.

Sustainability: Digital preservation activities will be planned and implemented in ways that best manage current resources and can be sustained into the future. 

Training: The Library will commit to on-going training and development of staff in areas related to digital preservation, as well as outreach to inform faculty, students, and staff of the best practices for creating and maintaining digital objects.

Technology: The Library will fulfill digital preservation objectives by developing, maintaining or contracting the necessary hardware, software, expertise, and protocols to ensure long term access.

 

Curtis Laws Wilson Library adheres to the following additional practices:

  1. Seeks to comply with the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) reference model standard and other digital preservation standards and practices as they evolve.
  2. Seeks to conform to certification requirements for ISO Standard 16363 for Trusted Digital Repositories.
  3. Adheres to prevailing community standards for preserving access to digital content of long-term value so that it remains readable, meaningful, and understandable.
  4. Commits to an interoperable, reliable, and scalable digital archive with appropriate storage management for content.
  5. Documents policies, procedures, and practices clearly and consistently.
  6. Maintains or contracts hardware, software, and storage media containing archival content in keeping with prevailing best practices, including adherence to environmental standards, quality control specifications, and security requirements.
  7. Establishes adequate and secure backup and disaster recovery safeguards.
  8. Establishes procedures to meet archival requirements pertaining to provenance, chain of custody, authenticity, and integrity of content.
  9. Captures and maintains adequate metadata to document digital content and what is required to provide access to the content.
  10. Defines a sustainability plan that ensures the cost-effective, transparent, and auditable management of the digital archive over time.
  11. Seeks to monitor threats to the accessibility of digital content.
  12. Complies with intellectual property, copyright, and ownership rights for preservation of and access to all content.
  13. Attempts to allocate adequate and appropriate resources and infrastructure for sustained digital preservation, acknowledging the need to tailor collecting programs according to the ability to preserve content and the availability of resources for preservation activities.

 

Scope

Curtis Laws Wilson Library is responsible for identifying, securing, and providing the means to preserve and ensure ongoing access to research data. Research data collected by the library fall into these general categories:

  1. Missouri S&T-owned research data: 
    • Analog research data objects owned by the Library or Missouri S&T that are selected for digital conversion.
    • Born-digital research data objects created by the Library or the Missouri S&T community.
    • Other digital research data objects collected by the Library or Missouri S&T that are unlikely to exist elsewhere.
  2. Selected research data generated by the Missouri S&T community:
    • Research data objects created in association to publications of faculty, students, research centers, labs and other community members.
    • Research data created by faculty, students, research centers, labs and other community members that exist independent of publications.
    • Other research data related to the research and scholarly activities of the Missouri S&T community.
  3. Selected research data related to campus culture and life.
  4. Research data related to University record: records created by colleges, departments, and other units within the university in the course of conducting business.

The library is committed to the preservation of research data throughout the research lifecycle and will develop the technical infrastructure to support the creation, maintenance, and access of digital resources for the long term. It is also committed to supporting staff in developing the expertise necessary to perform these activities.

Research data will be preserved and maintained for a minimum period of ten years. Longer-term preservation of research data beyond the ten year retention period is subject to:

  1. requests for longer preservation periods by the researcher,
  2. the Libraries' selection criteria and archival appraisal for long-term retention, and
  3. budget approval for staffing and related resources needed to accomplish this goal.

 

Research Data Preservation Priority

Curtis Laws Wilson Library is committed to the preserving and providing access to the following classes of research data with associated preservation priorities and commitment levels:

Priority 1: Data Sets associated with Publications. Extensive effort will be made to ensure preservation of data sets associated with journal publications or other scholarly publications in perpetuity, or for as long as the data sets meet the Libraries collection development policies and practices, or is superseded in the future by an acceptable data repository.

Priority 2a: Stand-Alone Data Publications. Reasonable step will be taken to preserve stand-alone data publications in accordance with best practices and collection development policies.

Priority 2b: Data Sets with High Research/Teaching Value. Reasonable step will be taken to preserve data sets that are identified by faculty, subject specialist librarians or archivists as having high value for meeting the research and teaching needs of Missouri S&T or within the broader research community.

Priority 3: Other Data Files and Materials. No preservation steps will be taken for ephemeral materials deemed to be of little or no long-term value to the comprehensiveness of the collection. Working files of particular significance to Missouri S&T's teaching and research needs, or within the greater research community, may be preserved on a select basis as appropriate.

Content Types and Files Sizes

There are no restrictions to the content types or file sizes for research data. However, there may be practical restrictions imposed by the technology and software employed by users accessing content.

Digital Preservation Strategies

The specific preservation strategy used for research data will depend on the source of and type of content, as well as existing technology, expertise, and ongoing support. Research Data will be managed by the Library using the life cycle model outlined below. The expectation is that the research data and associated metadata will be developed according to current standards and best practices, and stored in a long-term repository within the Library infrastructure.

Life Cycle Management

Research data will be managed using the life cycle model. This model is a framework describing the stages that research data go through during their existence. The preservation of research data requires planning and action at every stage of the lifecycle.  

Creation – As research data is created preservation actions should include creating and/or capturing administrative, descriptive, structural and technical metadata about the data, as well as imposing a well-defined storage system. Content will be created following current standards and best practices for capture and formatting.

Selection –Selection of research data for preservation will be done in coordination with current use, existing Library collection development policies, and collaborative agreements, while addressing specific format needs and budgetary limitations. All preservation actions will be taken under the assumption that data selected for the library collections are intended for permanent retention unless explicitly stated otherwise.

Ingest –Ingestion of research data into the collections will strictly follow local guidelines and procedures. These guidelines will include delivery of content to the responsible department/personnel, verification of file types, validation of file content, normalization of files as needed, creation or enhancement of metadata according to standards set forth in metadata policies, and transfer of data and metadata to an approved long-term storage system.

Metadata Creation – All research data will adhere to the Library metadata policy and practice. Essential preservation metadata includes:

  • Administrative
  • Technical
  • Structural
  • Provenance
  • Rights

Storage – Research data must be stored in a manner that is consistent with accepted best practices in the digital preservation community. This will include both technical infrastructure (hardware, software, network access, data backup, facilities, maintenance, etc.) and ongoing preservation management activities. Best practice in digital preservation requires duplicating digital objects in both local systems and geographically removed systems. The Library will pursue this by working with University IT and other service providers to host redundant local storage. Library staff will also explore other methods of storing data off site, such as in a private LOCKSS network, the HathiTrust, the Internet Archive, another data archive, or another collaborative group.

Preservation Management – A series of actions that will need to be performed on research data prior to and during long-term storage, and at varying levels depending on the source and type of data. Detailed procedures and workflows for preservation actions will be created and maintained. Possible preservation actions include, but are not limited to:

  • Content and metadata validation
  • Preservation audits – Preserved content will undergo periodic audits to ensure that activities are meeting stated commitments, that risks are reduced, and to verify authenticity and accessibility of content.
  • Ongoing file format review
  • Migration – conversion of data to new file formats and/or migration to new storage media as needed.
  • Definition and monitoring of backup procedures.
  • Maintenance of technical components such as hardware and software used for storage and access. 

Access and Use – Research data will be reviewed and managed to ensure that files are accessible into the future and the data is discoverable and created in a way that they may be easily found by all stakeholders.

Transformation – Research data may require periodic modification. Possible reasons for modification include: to support new developments in scholarly research capability, to function optimally in new delivery systems, and to prevent format, hardware, or software obsolescence. Types of modifications that may be performed include creating new content or metadata, adding content or metadata, migrating content to a new format, or creating a subset of content or metadata.

De-selection – Research data will be reviewed and disposed of as needed, based on collection development policies.

Stakeholders 

Stakeholders in digital preservation include the Library, users of Library collections, faculty, students and other University community units and members who create digital content housed by the Library. Explicit responsibilities of stakeholders in carrying out preservation strategies include:

Acquisitions – Manages the purchasing and licensing of electronic resources. 

Metadata Librarian – Manages the creation of metadata to ensure compliance with standards, best practices, and existing metadata policies.

Electronic Services Librarian – Manages the licensing of subscription-based digital content. Ensures that sufficient third-party preservation agreements are met whenever possible.

Collection Development Team – Manages the collection development review and de-selection of digital resources as needed. Ensures ongoing harmony of digital collections with print collections and the Library’s collection development policies. 

Archivist – (1) Manages University records, including ingestion of records into the records management system and subsequent transfer to Archives or other storage as needed. (2) Selects and manages College records and cultural artifacts to be preserved.

Scholarly Communications Librarian – (1) In cooperation with the Archivist manages the creation of digital content within the Library and ensures that standards and best practices are followed for the creation of digital content, including the capture of preservation metadata. (2) Oversees and manages the Library's digital preservation strategies, with particular emphasis on selection, ingestion, storage, preservation management, transformation, and coordination with third-party preservation services. Ensures general compliance with standards and best practices. Coordinates activities across departments and with external vendors. (3) Manages the Library's Digital Publishing Program. 

Scholars' Mine Team  – (1) Manages the creation, ingestion, and maintenance of digital objects into the Institutional Repository. (2) In coordination with other Library departments and Campus IT, manages the technical infrastructure needed to create, ingest, store, transform, and provide access to digital resources within the Institutional Repository. (3) Creates, installs, and maintains software as needed and provides support for staff using these tools. (4) Manages accessibility and user interface design to ensure usability and discoverability of digital resources.

Policy Review

This policy and the actions and activities associated with it will be evaluated regularly to ensure that implemented strategies continue to support the Library's mission and policies, use resources in a cost-effective manner, and adapt appropriately to address evolving technologies. This evaluation will be completed at least once every three years.

Standards and Best Practices

The Library will observe national and international standards and best practices for the creation and management of digital objects, along with the associated metadata needed to maintain research data throughout their lifecycle. Open source formats will be preferred.

Relevant standards include:

Open Archival Information System Reference Model (OAIS)

PREMIS Data Dictionary for Preservation Metadata

Data Seal of Approval

Digital Curation Center

Trustworthy Repositories Audit & Certification (TRAC)
 


 

 

Purpose

The protection of research subjects and the adherence to ethical norms are critical to responsible science. This policy outlines the actions and practices employed by Curtis laws Wilson Library (Library) to minimize disclosure risks, and to maintain the trust of those agreeing to have personal/sensitive data stored in the institutional repository (Scholars’ Mine).

This policy is subject to change as capabilities, standards, laws, policies, best practices and technology impact the Library's ability to preserve and make accessible digital resources. The intended audience for this policy includes:

  • faculty, administrators, and students of Missouri S&T, 
  • researchers external to Missouri S&T who are collaborating with Missouri S&T personnel and who want to make use of Scholars' Mine services,
  • funders, and
  • users.

The objective of this policy is to ensure that research data housed in Scholars’ Mine conforms to institutional policies and laws regarding the confidentiality and ethical practices in research.

Mandate

As an institution of higher learning Missouri S&T supports scholarship, teaching, and learning. The Library is responsible for identifying, acquiring, and preserving digital resources for as long as needed to support the activities of the University. The institutional repository's (Scholars' Mine) mandate for the preservation of these resources is drawn from responsibilities outlined above and specifically defined in: 

  • Lever 2.4.13 of Missouri S&T's strategic plan which states: “Continue development of Scholars' Mine designed for increasing internal and external communication and globally promoting the intellectual work of the campus.” 
  • Lever 5 of the Library strategic plan which states: "Explore opportunities to feature and develop Scholars’ Mine."  

The Library is committed to ensuring confidentiality and ethical practices associated with the research data in Scholars’ Mine.

Scope

The policy extends to all researchers submitting their research data to Scholars’ Mine.

Policy

It is the responsibility of the researcher to conduct their research in compliance with any applicable disciplinary norms and to be in compliance with the University of Missouri Collected Rules and Regulations (see: https://www.umsystem.edu/ums/rules/collected_rules/research). Researchers submitting data to Scholars’ Mine are required to acknowledge that they are in compliance and to provide an assessment of any disclosure risk.

Scholars’ Mine operates in compliance with the laws of the United States and the state of Missouri which address confidentiality, privacy and protection of research participants. Relevant federal laws include:

-           Protection of Human Subject (45 CFR 46)

-           The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

-           The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)

Scholars’ Mine requires that researchers submitting research data provide copies of all relevant documentation proving compliance with these laws.

Depositors of research data are also required to provide a disclosure risk assessment which is evaluated by trained library staff prior to acceptance. Data with a high disclosure risk may be rejected and returned to the researcher with advice on how to lower the risk. Also, access to data with high disclosure risks may be secured through access control measures. Scholars’ Mine offers four levels of access to data:

  1. open-access
  2. access restricted to defined IP addresses or domains
  3. access restricted to specific users requiring login authentication
  4. on-site access only under secure conditions.

Appropriate access levels are assigned to accepted data sets in consultation with the depositor.

Policy Review

This policy and the actions and activities associated with it will be evaluated regularly to ensure that implemented strategies continue to support the Library's mission and policies, use resources in a cost-effective manner, and adapt appropriately to address evolving law, and technologies. This evaluation will be completed at least once every three years.


 

Purpose

This policy provides guidance for content selection for our institutional repository (Scholars’ Mine). The purpose of this policy is to anticipate and meet the research support and information access needs of our campus community.

This policy is subject to change as capabilities, standards, laws, policies, best practices and technology impact the Library's ability to preserve and make accessible digital resources. The intended audience for this policy includes:

  • faculty, administrators, and students of Missouri S&T, 
  • researchers external to Missouri S&T who are collaborating with Missouri S&T personnel and who want to make use of Scholars' Mine services,
  • funders, and
  • users.

The objective of this policy is ensure that content housed within Scholars’ Mine meets our campus communities’ research support and information access needs that directly relate to Curtis Laws Wilson Library’s (Library) vision and objectives.

Mandate

As an institution of higher learning, Missouri S&T supports scholarship, teaching, and learning. The Library is responsible for identifying, acquiring, and preserving digital resources for as long as needed to support the activities of the University. The digital repository's (Scholars' Mine) mandate for the preservation of these resources is drawn from responsibilities outlined above and specifically defined in: 

  • Lever 2.4.13 of Missouri S&T's strategic plan which states: “Continue development of Scholars' Mine designed for increasing internal and external communication and globally promoting the intellectual work of the campus.” 
  • Lever 5 of the Library strategic plan which states: "Explore opportunities to feature and develop Scholars Mine."  

Scope

Content in Scholars’ Mine includes materials related to the research, educational, and cultural activities of our university community. This includes publications, research datasets, and other materials created by our faculty, students, administrators and affiliates. Affiliates are individuals not directly employed by the university or are organizations associated with university activities. Also included is content related to administrative activities, student life and campus culture.

Selection priority is given to tenured or tenure track faculty. For faculty, priority is also given to works created while in the employ of the University.

For all other content, selection priority is given to content that is unique or is of particular significance. For items that already exist in another database or repository, priority is given to those published in the past ten years.

 

Permissions

Content in Scholars’ Mine constitutes a digital instance based on permissions granted to the Library to preserve and make relevant resources available. This permission does not extend to other entities. Beyond the implicit right to read the content or download or print a copy for personal use, re-use rights vary based on the permissions granted by rights holders.

Withdrawal

Materials contained within Scholars’ Mine are made available in accordance with publisher policies, non-exclusive license agreements with author(s),compliance with U.S. copyright and intellectual property laws and are not intended for removal except in keeping with internal policy or upon receipt of a valid and proven request for withdrawal.

Policy Review

This policy and the actions and activities associated with it will be evaluated regularly to ensure that implemented strategies continue to support the Library's mission and policies, use resources in a cost-effective manner, and adapt appropriately to address evolving law and technologies. This evaluation will be completed at least once every three years.


 

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