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Research Data Management

“When we have all data online it will be great for humanity. It is a prerequisite to solving many problems that humankind faces.” – Robert Cailliau, Belgian informatics engineer and computer scientist who, together with Tim Berners-Lee, developed the Worl

GUIDE TO RESEARCH DATA MANAGEMENT

This guide presents information on the effective management of data created through research — including creating a data management plan for grant or project proposals, preserving data after project completion and sharing data with other researchers.

Worshop Registration

Data Management

Several federal research agencies now require data management plans as part of their funding proposals. Researchers are increasingly expected to provide open access to publicly funded research as part of verifying and replicating research results. This workshop provides a high-level overview of the research data lifecycle, focusing on areas to consider in order to effectively and responsibly manage research data.

Participants will learn about the basic requirements of a data management plan and where to go for additional, customized help in data management planning. Additionally, time will be set aside in the workshop to discuss future topics for additional workshops focusing on data management.

Lunch will be provided.

Date: Wednesday, September 21, 2016
Time: 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Location: Library, Room 103

 

Why Manage Research Data


  • Protect your data from loss by maintaining good backups and documentation

  • Secure your data through effective management of sensitive data

  • Conduct research efficiently by analyzing your data practices

  • Simplify the use and reuse of your data through proper documentation and application of standards

  • Increase your research visibility by publishing your datasets and documentation in

  • Meet funding agency, legal and ethical requirements for dissemination and documentation of your research

  • Preserve and provide access to your data in the long term, allowing future scholars to build on your work